Angle of Impact High-Speed Video Shooting Project

Early in 2016 Don Ledbetter (Seattle Police Department) invited me to present at the PNWD-IAI conference in Tulalip, Washington, USA in June 2016. He specifically requested a talk on using HemoSpat for shooting incident reconstruction.

The talk I put together focused on Dr. Victor Balthazard’s work on determining angles of impact from ellipses. I thought it was important to conduct some original research to present, so I decided to record high-speed video of bullets striking different substrates at different angles so I could show how ellipses are formed by bullets.

Dr. Victor Balthazard

Dr. Victor Balthazard

I enlisted the help of Ugo Garneau of the Ottawa Police Service, and he took point on a lot of the logistics such as organizing the shooting range and building the contraption to hold the substrates. I arranged with Trevor McLeod of the Ontario Provincial Police to borrow their FASTCAM SA-X high-speed video camera which was set up and managed by Gord Lefebvre (Ontario Provincial Police, Retired).

Shooting Range Setup

Shooting Range Setup

Dan Kunsken and AndrĂ©e Leduc—both of the Ottawa Police Service—rounded out the team. We shot plywood, cedar, and drywall at 15°, 25°, 35°, 45°, 55°, and 65°. (With one exception – we did not get cedar at 15° due to time constraints.)

FORident Shooting Project Results

FORident Shooting Project Results

One of the goals of the project was to provide the high-speed videos for people to use for education and training. These videos are being made available in a YouTube playlist (Angle of Impact High-Speed Video Shooting Project) as I get them processed and uploaded.

Here’s an example video:


It took a number of people to bring this project together. Thanks especially to the following for their “on-the-ground” help & support:

And thank you to the following for helping out with admin, resources, personnel, and advice:

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me.

Andy Maloney
25 July 2016